Rent the Winklevoss Twins’ L.A. Party Pad for $150,000 Per Month

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Winklevoss Twins Mansion

When it comes to Facebook, finishing second best wasn’t so bad after all.

Bitcoin investors, Facebook-progenitors and former Olympic rowers Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss are renting their minimalist Los Angeles mansion for a whopping $150,000 per month—and the social networking possibilities there are limitless. The sleek home is located in the Bird Streets area, tucked on a steep slope high above the Sunset Strip.

The minimalist mansion with floor-to-ceiling glass walls and manicured lawns can be rented for $150,000 per month.

The minimalist mansion with floor-to-ceiling glass walls and manicured lawns can be rented for $150,000 per month.

The 8,000-square-foot space opens up to an outdoor terrace.

The 8,000-square-foot space boasts a loggia that opens to the outdoor terrace and pool.

Straight out of a movie set, the massive modern five-bedroom, nine-bathroom estate is ideal for entertaining on a grand scale. You don’t rent this place merely to crash for the night. In fact, we’re not sure if any sleeping goes on in this house—unless it’s out of lust. The estate is a pure showstopper.

With easy open-air access via huge sliding glass doors, an L-shaped  negative-edge swimming pool, terraces, a tanning-shelf, a lounge with wet bar, media room and jaw-dropping panoramic “jetliner views” of L.A., this home is primed for partying all the time.

The home opens up to allow breezy night air to flow through the house.

The home opens up to allow breezy night air to flow through the house.

The home's open spaces are ideal for entertaining

The home’s open spaces are ideal for entertaining, including this minimalist kitchen.

Dining area

Dining area

The home features polished slab limestone floors throughout the sprawling interconnected spaces, which includes five en-suite bedrooms, an office/library with custom-crafted built-in storage, and a combination kitchen/dining/living area so large it looks abandoned when not used. Clearly this area isn’t the home’s most important space in which to hang out. But it’s nice, and there when necessary.

One of five bedrooms

One of five bedrooms

Guest bedroom. although we doubt much sleeping goes on in this home.

Guest bedroom. although we doubt much sleeping goes on in this home.

The estate has nine bathrooms

The estate has nine bathrooms

Living space with ample lighting and a modern fireplace

Living space with ample lighting and a modern fireplace

James Bond Alpha male media room

James Bond Alpha male media room

The 8,000-square-foot contemporary home is immaculately manicured, boasting extensive floor-to-ceiling transparent glass and spaces so wide open, twins could host an “Unthink” rally (antisocial networking group) or an “I Hate Mark Zuckerberg” party for nearly everyone in L.A. not on Facebook.

The Winklevosses (or Winklevi, as tandemly teased in the Oscar-winning The Social Network film) could probably practice rowing in the pool. The space could host a holiday party for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Angels, Lakers, Clippers, and Kings, and still have room leftover. The eventual renter could comfortably ride a bike through the home—and by bike we mean a Harley Davidson. It’s that big and open. The house should be converted into L.A.’s coolest nightclub.

Patio view of Los Angeles at night

Patio view of Los Angeles at night

Outdoor patio area

Outdoor patio area with more signs of OCD-like perfectionism. It’s a sleep-deprived estate with lots of pillow-talk.

Open-air loggia adjacent to the pool

Open-air loggia adjacent to the pool

Pool view of Los Angeles and the Sunset Strip below

Pool view of Los Angeles and the Sunset Strip below

Negative-edge swimming pool

Negative-edge swimming pool

Not exactly warm and cozy (sans the pool and fancy modern fireplaces), the home almost looks staged by two Alpha male perfectionists—down to the James Bond 007 scenes on the massive TV wall and underground garage for six luxury cars or even more crew racing shells.

Panoramic view of downtown Los Angeles

The Winklevoss Facebook settlement with Mark Zuckerberg elevated the twins to the top 1%.

The venture capitalist identical twin brothers who claimed their Harvard classmate Zuckerberg stole their idea for Facebook (and eventually settled for $65 million), bought the home in 2012 for $18 million (not bad for pseudo-inventors). Even though Zuckerberg’s determination sealed their legacy, the twins and Zuckerberg aren’t likely Facebook friends.

We can only wonder where and how the Winklevoss twins upgraded after this home. But we’re sure the trailer of the next James Bond film is paused in their new media room.

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